Population Matters

25th anniversary appeal

25th anniversary appeal

In 2016, Population Matters is celebrating our 25th anniversary. To continue to grow in influence over the next 25 years, our goal is to raise £25,000 in addition to regular donations by the end of this special year. To help us reach this goal, and to mark our 25th anniversary, please consider making a donation in a combination of two and five, such as £25 or £250.

Your support will enable us to carry out our campaigning, lobbying, education and research, and help us to move population up the public agenda.

Donate

You may instead send a cheque along with our print form to our office address, call us on +44 (0)208 1239116 or use the Charities Aid Foundation. You can give a donation as a gift — just contact us with the name of the recipient and your message. Please include a reference to the 25th anniversary appeal.

Why donate?

Population numbers affect everyone's well-being, other species and humanity's futurePopulation numbers affect everyone’s well-being, other species and humanity’s future.

  • We promote smaller families at home and abroad.
  • We publish research reports on the links between population numbers and resource security.
  • We develop materials on population and sustainability for teachers and others.
  • We lobby governments and international institutions by attending events and responding to consultations. We staff stalls, speak at fringe meetings and provide briefings.
  • We ask civil society to recognize that population size matters to the causes they promote.
  • We form local groups to raise awareness of population and sustainability, and support them with advice and materials.

View information about our fundraising standards and complaints policy.

Celebrating 25 years

As part of our celebration, we wanted to share the stories of our members who have supported us along the way. We asked several members to answer one of the following questions:

  • Looking back 25 years and how much the world has changed, what concerns have you had that make population and environmental sustainability an important issue for you?
  • What are your hopes for change over the next 25 years?

Here are some of their responses:

Edmund Davey, Former Chair and member of the Education Group

We need to educate the public about the interdependence between our species and all others“When I became acting chair in 2001 my main concern was the destruction of the natural world. It still is. We need to educate the public about the interdependence between our species and all others. As members of the education group, we believe this should start with children.”

John Guillebaud, Former Chair

Human family planning is a critical issue for the future of all life on this planet“Not an important issue — it’s the paramount important issue, above all others. My concern goes back a lot further to my medical student days, when I decided that with respect to the future of all life on the planet, family planning was the most important specialty in medicine. I therefore ensured I got higher training in both surgery and gynaecology so as to become a specialist in this field for both genders.”

Aubrey Manning, Patron

Aubrey Manning, Population Matters Patron“At the moment the mind-set in Britain is extremely pro-natalist … We need to get across the idea that fertility has to be under control. It’s so ridiculous that at the moment if a woman says she doesn’t want a child she’s regarded as selfish, an outcast, a pariah. We need to recognise that populations have been growing for centuries; it’s about time they started declining, sustainably. We don’t want to have a fast decline.”

Roger Martin, President

Roger Martin, Population Matters President“With some two billion more people than 25 years ago, it is even more obvious that the more we are, the more we degrade our life-support system, and the smaller each person’s share of our dwindling natural resources. Getting these simple facts across to people, and killing off the ‘mad taboo’ on recognising them, is more important than ever.”

Jonathon Porritt, Patron

Jonathon Porritt, Population Matters Patron“The future of humankind depends on one simple insight: that there can be no just and truly sustainable world unless we urgently prioritise investment in non-coercive family planning, and keep on doing so until our population stabilises and then starts to decline. That insight is as true now as when I started out with the Green Party 40 years ago.”

Valerie Stevens, Former Chair

We're helping to break the taboo on discussing the environmental impact of our massive population growth“In the 25 years that I’ve been involved with Population Matters, world population has massively increased, so that feels like failure. But at least the issues of population growth and environmental impact are now discussed openly — the taboo seems to be crumbling, so that feels like success.”