Population Matters

Malcolm Potts our newest patron

Malcolm Potts our newest patron

Malcolm Potts MB, BChir, PhD, FRCOG has accepted an invitation from Population Matters to become its latest patron. He follows Baroness Shreela Flather, Lionel Shriver, Chris Packham, Dame Jane Goodall and Sir David Attenborough in supporting the work of the organization, which is Britain’s leading charity campaigning for a sustainable global population.

Malcolm Potts

Malcolm Potts is a Cambridge-trained obstetrician and reproductive scientist. He is a professor in Maternal and Child Health and the first and former (1992 – 2013) holder of the Fred H. Bixby Endowed Chair in Population and Family Planning of the School of Public Health of the University of California – Berkeley and developed the Bixby Center with a team of young experts.

For more than a decade while Potts was the first Medical Director of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, he introduced family planning methods into scores of developing countries. As the CEO of Family Health International, he launched the first large-scale studies of maternal mortality, which helped to start the worldwide Safe Motherhood Initiative.

Potts has published more than 10 books and 300 scientific papers. Among his books are Queen Victoria’s Gene and Ever Since Adam and Eve: The Evolution of Human Sexuality. His most recent book is Sex and War: How Biology Explains War and Terrorism and Offers a Path to a Safer World.

Malcolm Potts

Potts’ current efforts focus on the Organizing to Advance Solutions in the Sahel Initiative, a global multidisciplinary partnership working on solutions to the increasingly complex problems in global health and development in the Sahel.

Population Matters Chair Roger Martin said, “We are delighted that Malcolm has lent us his support. Population growth as a multiplier of all environmental and resource problems, and a major factor in many social, economic and humanitarian ones, is returning to the political agenda in the face of the growing imbalance between our numbers and consumption — ‘ever more people consuming ever more stuff’ and our planet’s finite and dwindling resources.”

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